DeHL 0.8.2 is out

DeHL

I’ve just released the version 0.8.2 of DeHL. The downloads can be found on this page and changelog on this page.
Again, this is a minor release with a few bugs fixed and a new feature: TString (as asked in this comment).
As you might have guessed already, TString is a wrapper record modeled on .NET’s System.String class. Unfortunately I was unable to use most of the RTL’s string functionality so the “wrapper” grew quite a bit from my original expectations.

But … enough talk, here are some usage scenarios that someone may find useful:

var
  LStr: TString;
begin
  { Overloaded operators and a special function "U" }
  LStr := U('Hello World for the ') + 10 + 'th time!';

  { Do some random operations }
  if (LStr.ToUpper().Contains('HELLO')) and
     (LStr.Contains('HeLLo', scLocaleIgnoreCase)) then
  WriteLn(LStr.ToString);

  { Now let's select all the distinct chars from the string }
  WriteLn(
    LStr.Concat(LStr.AsCollection.Distinct.Op.Cast<string>).ToString
  );
end.

TString overloads all sane operators: Equality, Inequality, Implicit conversions, Addition, Subtraction and offers functions to convert to and from UTF8 and UCS4 (via RTL of course). I also need to iron a few things about about Enex integration for the next minor release.

The other small improvement that I added relates to the collection package. All simple collections (not the Key/Value pair ones) implement a sort of “where T is the_class, select it as such” operation. Check out this example:

var
  LList: TList<TObject>;
  LBuilder: TStringBuilder;
  LObject: TObject;
begin
  LList := TList<TObject>.Create;

  { Populate the list with some random objects }
  LList.Add(TInterfacedObject.Create);
  LList.Add(TStringBuilder.Create);
  LList.Add(TStringBuilder.Create);
  LList.Add(TObject.Create);

  { Now select the objects we're interested in (string builders) }
  for LBuilder in LList.Op.Select<TStringBuilder> do
    WriteLn(LBuilder.ClassName); // Do stuff

  { Or select everything (not actually required - an example) }
  for LObject in LList.Op.Select<TObject> do
    WriteLn(LObject.ClassName); // Do stuff
end.

If it’s still not clear what this operations does, let me explain. It basically consists of two operations: Where and Select. First, each object is checked to be of a given class and then this object is cast to that class so you can iterate directly using a FOR .. IN loop only over the objects you want to. Of course doing that for TObject makes no sense (as in example) … but well … that was an example.

Well, that’s all for today,
Have Fun!

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